29 November 2017

In the run up to Christmas people across the world travel to various Christmas markets which are famous for providing a range of attractions, from ice skating to mulled wine and various rides.
We have compiled a list of the best Christmas markets that you have to visit!

Zagreb, Croatia
The capital of Croatia has been voted two times in a row as “European Best Christmas Market”. During the time of Advent, Zagreb offers a very special Christmas atmosphere that you simply must experience. 


A growing number of tourists choose the capital of Croatia as their go to destination for a weekend break! The city streets and squares provide loads of entertainment including singing, dancing, traditional delicacies and various themed attractions.

When: 2nd December 2017 to 7th January 2018

Dresden, Germany
Dresden is a great destination with a grand total of eleven completely different Christmas markets which all have different themes, stretching from the main railway station and the Albertplatz with the main Dresden Striezelmarkt 
located in the historical city centre. 

The focal point of the Dresden Christmas Market is the world’s tallest Christmas pyramid with a height of 14 metres and the world’s biggest nut cracker.

When: 29th November to 24th December 2017

Prague, Czech Republic

The main markets in Prague are located at the Old Town Square and Wenceslas Square which are 5 minutes walk from each other. With large hams roasted on spits you need to sample the tasty barbequed sausages and cakes and pastries prepared in front of you. 
The most impressive is the mighty Christmas tree transported every year from the forests of Central Bohemia.

When: 2nd December 2017 to 6th January 2018


Brussels, Belgium

Brussels Christmas Market takes place on and around Grand-Place, Bourse, Place Sainte-Catherine and Marché aux Poissons. You will be enchanted by the magical son et lumière illuminations on the Grand-Place. 

Attractions also include merry-go-rounds, the large wheel and ice rink at Marché aux Poissons.

When: 24th November to 31st December 2017


Metz, France

Metz Christmas Market is considered as France’s second most visited market after that of Strasbourg. The city is know for its lofty gothic Cathedral St Etienne and its German Imperial District.

Metz takes pride in being a vibrant provincial town in the region of Lorraine. The attractions include ice sculptures at the Frozen Fairyland, a walk through magic forest and the merry-go-around and of course, ice skating!

When: 18th November to 30th December 2017

If you are taking a trip make sure you have your Travel Insurance sorted, call Discount Insurance on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote!
Wednesday, November 29, 2017
In the run up to Christmas people across the world travel to various Christmas markets which are famous for providing a range of attractions, from ice skating to mulled wine and various rides.
We have compiled a list of the best Christmas markets that you have to visit!

Zagreb, Croatia
The capital of Croatia has been voted two times in a row as “European Best Christmas Market”. During the time of Advent, Zagreb offers a very special Christmas atmosphere that you simply must experience. 


A growing number of tourists choose the capital of Croatia as their go to destination for a weekend break! The city streets and squares provide loads of entertainment including singing, dancing, traditional delicacies and various themed attractions.

When: 2nd December 2017 to 7th January 2018

Dresden, Germany
Dresden is a great destination with a grand total of eleven completely different Christmas markets which all have different themes, stretching from the main railway station and the Albertplatz with the main Dresden Striezelmarkt 
located in the historical city centre. 

The focal point of the Dresden Christmas Market is the world’s tallest Christmas pyramid with a height of 14 metres and the world’s biggest nut cracker.

When: 29th November to 24th December 2017

Prague, Czech Republic

The main markets in Prague are located at the Old Town Square and Wenceslas Square which are 5 minutes walk from each other. With large hams roasted on spits you need to sample the tasty barbequed sausages and cakes and pastries prepared in front of you. 
The most impressive is the mighty Christmas tree transported every year from the forests of Central Bohemia.

When: 2nd December 2017 to 6th January 2018


Brussels, Belgium

Brussels Christmas Market takes place on and around Grand-Place, Bourse, Place Sainte-Catherine and Marché aux Poissons. You will be enchanted by the magical son et lumière illuminations on the Grand-Place. 

Attractions also include merry-go-rounds, the large wheel and ice rink at Marché aux Poissons.

When: 24th November to 31st December 2017


Metz, France

Metz Christmas Market is considered as France’s second most visited market after that of Strasbourg. The city is know for its lofty gothic Cathedral St Etienne and its German Imperial District.

Metz takes pride in being a vibrant provincial town in the region of Lorraine. The attractions include ice sculptures at the Frozen Fairyland, a walk through magic forest and the merry-go-around and of course, ice skating!

When: 18th November to 30th December 2017

If you are taking a trip make sure you have your Travel Insurance sorted, call Discount Insurance on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote!

15 November 2017

The countdown to Christmas has begun! With Halloween done and dusted, Christmas adverts on TV and the weather getting colder everyone is slowly getting into the Christmas spirit!

As the most wonderful time of the year nears, we have combined a list of real-life winter wonderlands perfect for getaway this Christmas period!

Lapland

Santa Claus’ official home has an abundance of activities on offer including husky and reindeer sledding! Of course you also get to meet Santa in Santa Claus village and cross the Arctic Circle 50m underground at SantaPark. This one definitely takes the number one spot for the most Christmassy destinations!

Lapland is located in the northernmost region of Finland and apart from being the official home to Santa Claus, it is a sparsely populated area known for its ski resorts and natural phenomena such as the midnight sun and the Northern Lights.

















Christmas Island

Named after its discovery in 1643 on Christmas day, this island lies in the Indian Ocean and is actually a part of Australia. If you are looking to get away from the cold and celebrate in the warmer weather this is the place to be.

You can enjoy your holiday by going scuba diving or snorkeling, and even turtle spotting. The nesting season takes place all year around on this island so be on the lookout for hatchlings! If you are lucky you could also witness the annual red crab migration taking place, when the creatures leave their burrows and head to the sea to breed.

Bethlehem

People from all over the world make the pilgrimage to Jesus’ birthplace in Bethlehem at Christmas and if you want to be one of those people make sure you visit the sacred sites which include the Church of the Nativity, the location where Jesus is believed to have been born. There are plenty of concerts that take place at this time of year too.

And if you want to send your Christmas cards from Bethlehem but don’t want to travel all the way to Palestine, why not head to the small farming village of Bethlehem in Wales and send them from there with a unique Bethlehem postmark.















Barcelona

If you are one of the people who wishes that Christmas did not end so quickly, head to Barcelona! The celebrations continue until 6th January – Three King’s Day – when three dressed up Kings arrive by boat in Barcelona’s port and parade through the streets. They are accompanied by dance and circus acts on decorated floats and treats are thrown out to children in the crowd.














New York
The Big Apple is famous for its oversized Christmas decorations that adorn the city, making it a spectacle in December. The attractions include the huge Rockefeller Christmas Tree, ice skating in Central Park and the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes Christmas Spectacular – an all-singing, all-dancing festive extravaganza.

Or if you are up for something calmer, you can grab a hot chocolate and take a walk through the streets of New York or enjoy some shopping in the famous Fifth Avenue!















Santa Claus
This town in Indiana, USA does more than live up to its name. It has a Santa Claus Museum and a 1.2 mile Land of Lights at Lake Rudolph for you to explore!
You can pick up some tasty treats in one of the many Christmas stores including Holly Tree Christmas Shop and enjoy a drink at the local craft beer festival – the Brew Ho Ho.

If you are travelling this winter season ensure you are protected! Discount Insurance can help you get your Travel Insurance sorted quickly and easily quote here or call 0800 294 4522!
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
The countdown to Christmas has begun! With Halloween done and dusted, Christmas adverts on TV and the weather getting colder everyone is slowly getting into the Christmas spirit!

As the most wonderful time of the year nears, we have combined a list of real-life winter wonderlands perfect for getaway this Christmas period!

Lapland

Santa Claus’ official home has an abundance of activities on offer including husky and reindeer sledding! Of course you also get to meet Santa in Santa Claus village and cross the Arctic Circle 50m underground at SantaPark. This one definitely takes the number one spot for the most Christmassy destinations!

Lapland is located in the northernmost region of Finland and apart from being the official home to Santa Claus, it is a sparsely populated area known for its ski resorts and natural phenomena such as the midnight sun and the Northern Lights.

















Christmas Island

Named after its discovery in 1643 on Christmas day, this island lies in the Indian Ocean and is actually a part of Australia. If you are looking to get away from the cold and celebrate in the warmer weather this is the place to be.

You can enjoy your holiday by going scuba diving or snorkeling, and even turtle spotting. The nesting season takes place all year around on this island so be on the lookout for hatchlings! If you are lucky you could also witness the annual red crab migration taking place, when the creatures leave their burrows and head to the sea to breed.

Bethlehem

People from all over the world make the pilgrimage to Jesus’ birthplace in Bethlehem at Christmas and if you want to be one of those people make sure you visit the sacred sites which include the Church of the Nativity, the location where Jesus is believed to have been born. There are plenty of concerts that take place at this time of year too.

And if you want to send your Christmas cards from Bethlehem but don’t want to travel all the way to Palestine, why not head to the small farming village of Bethlehem in Wales and send them from there with a unique Bethlehem postmark.















Barcelona

If you are one of the people who wishes that Christmas did not end so quickly, head to Barcelona! The celebrations continue until 6th January – Three King’s Day – when three dressed up Kings arrive by boat in Barcelona’s port and parade through the streets. They are accompanied by dance and circus acts on decorated floats and treats are thrown out to children in the crowd.














New York
The Big Apple is famous for its oversized Christmas decorations that adorn the city, making it a spectacle in December. The attractions include the huge Rockefeller Christmas Tree, ice skating in Central Park and the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes Christmas Spectacular – an all-singing, all-dancing festive extravaganza.

Or if you are up for something calmer, you can grab a hot chocolate and take a walk through the streets of New York or enjoy some shopping in the famous Fifth Avenue!















Santa Claus
This town in Indiana, USA does more than live up to its name. It has a Santa Claus Museum and a 1.2 mile Land of Lights at Lake Rudolph for you to explore!
You can pick up some tasty treats in one of the many Christmas stores including Holly Tree Christmas Shop and enjoy a drink at the local craft beer festival – the Brew Ho Ho.

If you are travelling this winter season ensure you are protected! Discount Insurance can help you get your Travel Insurance sorted quickly and easily quote here or call 0800 294 4522!

25 October 2017


The Halloween season is upon us! It is time to start looking for your Halloween outfits, stocking up on sweets and carving out your pumpkins. Although here in the UK we might not celebrate Halloween as enthusiastically as in the USA, it is still as much a part of the autumn season. But many don’t know about the origins of Halloween, celebrations which go back to Celtic traditions.


What is Halloween?

Halloween or Hallowe’en (a contraction of All Hallows’ Evening) is also known as Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Eve or All Saints’ Eve and is a spooky celebration observed every year in a number of countries on 31st October – the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day also known as All Saints’ Day.

Halloween as we know and experience it today has originated in the Celtic fringes of Britain and was adapted over the years by Christian traditions and immigrants’ conventions.


What is the story behind celebrating Halloween?

The origin of Halloween is disputed. There are both Pagan and Christian practices, which have impacted the celebrations and allowed it to evolve into what it is today.

Some believe Halloween originates from Samhain, a Celtic pagan festival meaning ‘Summer’s End’ which celebrated the end of harvest season.

Gaels believed this was a time when the walls between our world and the next became thin allowing spirits to pass, come back to life on the day and damage their crops. Therefore during a feast they set places at the dinner table to appease and welcome the spirits. Gaels would also offer food and drink as well as light bonfires to ward off the evil spirits.

Trick or treating and dressing up came from the 16th century in Ireland, Scotland and Wales where people went door-to-door in costume asking for food in exchange for a poem or song. Many people dressed up as souls of the dead and were understood to be protecting themselves from the spirits by impersonating them. 

Christian origins of the holiday are connected to the feast of All Hallows on the 1st November, which was set in the eighth century in the efforts of the Church to stamp out pagan celebrations. Christians honour saints and pray for souls of their relatives who passed away and those who have not yet reached heaven.


Where does trick-or-treating come from?

The original phrase was first used in America in 1972. The traditions were brought over to America by immigrants while guising gave way to pranks in exchange for sweet treats.

During World War II there was a short supply of sweets and sugar therefore after the war ended Halloween became a widespread holiday revolving around kids with newly built suburban areas being a safe place for children to roam free.

The costumes people wore became a lot more adventurous in Victorian times influenced by literature and in particular the gothic themes – dressing as bats and ghosts or what seemed as exotic and different like an Egyptian pharaoh. As times moved on, costumes became influenced by pop culture.


What has Halloween got to do with dressing up?

The tradition of dressing up again has to do with the Celts, they dressed up in white with blackened faces during Samhain to trick the evil spirits which they believed would be roaming the earth before All Saints’ Day on November 1st.

By the 11th century this had been adapted by the Church, again in order to stamp out pagan celebrations. The Church introduced a tradition called ‘souling’  which is seen as being the origin of trick-or-treating as children would go door-to-door asking for soul cakes in exchange for praying for the souls of friends and relatives. Traditionally children went dressed up as angels, demons or saints. The soul cakes given to the children were sweet, with a cross marked on top and when they were eaten by the children they represented a soul being freed from purgatory.

A historian at York University, Nicholas Rogers says that when people prayed for the dead at Hallow Mass, they dressed up. In particular when praying for fertile marriages "the boy choristers in the churches dressed up as virgins. So there was a certain degree of cross dressing in the actual ceremony of All Hallow’s Eve.”

In the 19th century souling became guising or mumming where children would offer songs, poems or jokes instead of prayer for money or fruit.


What do pumpkins have to do with all of this?

This is another Celt tradition originating from the Samhain festival. Gaels would carve turnips in order to ward off spirits and stop fairies from settling in their houses.

The influx of Irish immigrants to North America in the 1840s couldn’t find any turnips to carve, as was the tradition, so they used the more readily available pumpkin, carving into it scary faces.

By the 1920s the pumpkin carving was widespread across America and Halloween was a big holiday with dressing up and trick-or-treating. The modern American name Jack O’Lantern on the other hand comes from the folkloric story of Stingy Jack who fooled the devil into buying him a drink. He was not let into heaven or hell and when he passed away the devil threw him a burning ember which he kept in a turnip.


 Most peculiar traditions from around the world:

Ireland – the tradition of barmbrack, a fruitcake featuring muslin-wrapped treats inside that is said to predict the future of the eater. If the cloth contains a ring, it means romance is in the cards. A coin indicates wealth is on its way. A thimble means you're doomed to never marry.

Austria - you are expected to leave bread and water out and keep the lights on after you go to bed during the full week of All Saint’s Week between 30th October and 8th November to happily welcome dead souls back to Earth during the one time of the year they can visit the mortal world.

Germany - this tradition is also about believing spirits return on Halloween night. Rather than leaving out bread and water like in Austria, Germans put away any knives so the spirits don’t hurt themselves.

Czechoslovakia – chairs are left out for each deceased family member by the fire on Halloween night alongside chairs for each living one.

Our prices are un-boo-lievable this Halloween! Call 0800 294 4522 to get a quote on our fang-tastic range of products including Home Insurance, Landlord Insurance and Caravan Insurance!

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

The Halloween season is upon us! It is time to start looking for your Halloween outfits, stocking up on sweets and carving out your pumpkins. Although here in the UK we might not celebrate Halloween as enthusiastically as in the USA, it is still as much a part of the autumn season. But many don’t know about the origins of Halloween, celebrations which go back to Celtic traditions.


What is Halloween?

Halloween or Hallowe’en (a contraction of All Hallows’ Evening) is also known as Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Eve or All Saints’ Eve and is a spooky celebration observed every year in a number of countries on 31st October – the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day also known as All Saints’ Day.

Halloween as we know and experience it today has originated in the Celtic fringes of Britain and was adapted over the years by Christian traditions and immigrants’ conventions.


What is the story behind celebrating Halloween?

The origin of Halloween is disputed. There are both Pagan and Christian practices, which have impacted the celebrations and allowed it to evolve into what it is today.

Some believe Halloween originates from Samhain, a Celtic pagan festival meaning ‘Summer’s End’ which celebrated the end of harvest season.

Gaels believed this was a time when the walls between our world and the next became thin allowing spirits to pass, come back to life on the day and damage their crops. Therefore during a feast they set places at the dinner table to appease and welcome the spirits. Gaels would also offer food and drink as well as light bonfires to ward off the evil spirits.

Trick or treating and dressing up came from the 16th century in Ireland, Scotland and Wales where people went door-to-door in costume asking for food in exchange for a poem or song. Many people dressed up as souls of the dead and were understood to be protecting themselves from the spirits by impersonating them. 

Christian origins of the holiday are connected to the feast of All Hallows on the 1st November, which was set in the eighth century in the efforts of the Church to stamp out pagan celebrations. Christians honour saints and pray for souls of their relatives who passed away and those who have not yet reached heaven.


Where does trick-or-treating come from?

The original phrase was first used in America in 1972. The traditions were brought over to America by immigrants while guising gave way to pranks in exchange for sweet treats.

During World War II there was a short supply of sweets and sugar therefore after the war ended Halloween became a widespread holiday revolving around kids with newly built suburban areas being a safe place for children to roam free.

The costumes people wore became a lot more adventurous in Victorian times influenced by literature and in particular the gothic themes – dressing as bats and ghosts or what seemed as exotic and different like an Egyptian pharaoh. As times moved on, costumes became influenced by pop culture.


What has Halloween got to do with dressing up?

The tradition of dressing up again has to do with the Celts, they dressed up in white with blackened faces during Samhain to trick the evil spirits which they believed would be roaming the earth before All Saints’ Day on November 1st.

By the 11th century this had been adapted by the Church, again in order to stamp out pagan celebrations. The Church introduced a tradition called ‘souling’  which is seen as being the origin of trick-or-treating as children would go door-to-door asking for soul cakes in exchange for praying for the souls of friends and relatives. Traditionally children went dressed up as angels, demons or saints. The soul cakes given to the children were sweet, with a cross marked on top and when they were eaten by the children they represented a soul being freed from purgatory.

A historian at York University, Nicholas Rogers says that when people prayed for the dead at Hallow Mass, they dressed up. In particular when praying for fertile marriages "the boy choristers in the churches dressed up as virgins. So there was a certain degree of cross dressing in the actual ceremony of All Hallow’s Eve.”

In the 19th century souling became guising or mumming where children would offer songs, poems or jokes instead of prayer for money or fruit.


What do pumpkins have to do with all of this?

This is another Celt tradition originating from the Samhain festival. Gaels would carve turnips in order to ward off spirits and stop fairies from settling in their houses.

The influx of Irish immigrants to North America in the 1840s couldn’t find any turnips to carve, as was the tradition, so they used the more readily available pumpkin, carving into it scary faces.

By the 1920s the pumpkin carving was widespread across America and Halloween was a big holiday with dressing up and trick-or-treating. The modern American name Jack O’Lantern on the other hand comes from the folkloric story of Stingy Jack who fooled the devil into buying him a drink. He was not let into heaven or hell and when he passed away the devil threw him a burning ember which he kept in a turnip.


 Most peculiar traditions from around the world:

Ireland – the tradition of barmbrack, a fruitcake featuring muslin-wrapped treats inside that is said to predict the future of the eater. If the cloth contains a ring, it means romance is in the cards. A coin indicates wealth is on its way. A thimble means you're doomed to never marry.

Austria - you are expected to leave bread and water out and keep the lights on after you go to bed during the full week of All Saint’s Week between 30th October and 8th November to happily welcome dead souls back to Earth during the one time of the year they can visit the mortal world.

Germany - this tradition is also about believing spirits return on Halloween night. Rather than leaving out bread and water like in Austria, Germans put away any knives so the spirits don’t hurt themselves.

Czechoslovakia – chairs are left out for each deceased family member by the fire on Halloween night alongside chairs for each living one.

Our prices are un-boo-lievable this Halloween! Call 0800 294 4522 to get a quote on our fang-tastic range of products including Home Insurance, Landlord Insurance and Caravan Insurance!

04 October 2017



Whether you own one property or 5 it is important to keep on top of all the paperwork to ensure that everything is legally in order for all the properties you are letting out and easily accessible if you need it. We have combined a list of ten key pieces of documentation you should have up to date and to hand.

Energy Performance Certificate also known as EPC. Before you can market your property for rent you must be in possession of a valid EPC with the rating clearly displayed on all advertisements of the property. You must have a copy for any prospective tenants to view and one to provide to your tenants when they move in.

Gas Safety Certificate proving that the gas system in the property has been checked by a Gas Safety registered engineer within the last 12 months and is in full working order. This is an annual check that needs to be completed at your property. Ensure you provide your tenants with a copy and if your property is a HMO it needs to be clearly displayed in a communal area.

Fire Risk Assessment form. Under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) you have an obligation to identify potential hazards in the property and take any reasonable steps to minimize the risk of your tenant suffering injury. The best way to prove you have completed this check is to complete a risk assessment form available online here or from your local fire department. It is a good idea to have a qualified safety professional carry out the assessment on your behalf, ensure you keep the form safe and revise every few years or when there’s a change to the hazards in the property.

Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate/Electrical Installation Condition report. The certificate normally issued when a system is installed or updated and the condition report when it’s tested. In an HMO the electrics must legally be checked every five years. In a single let property there is no specific timescale for regular inspections however you are legally obliged to ensure the electrical system is safe. Electrical Safety First recommends inspections on change of tenancy or every five years. You do not need to provide tenants with the paperwork but you might have to prove when the last inspection took place in case of any problems.

'Right to rent’ check paperwork and any correspondence and other information obtained when you verified your tenants identity and their legal status within the UK. In case your tenants are ever proven to be in the UK illegally you must be able to show you took every care to check their status. Remember to make a note of any visa expiry dates so that you can re-check the documents when needed.

Assured Shorthold Tenancy or other tenancy agreement. It is vital that you do not let any tenant move into the property without signing a tenancy agreement. This agreement should demonstrate that the tenant understands their rights and responsibilities and agrees to comply with them. If you ever need or want the tenant to leave the property it is vital you are able to quickly and clearly identify the date the tenancy started and the terms of agreement so you can serve the correct notices at the right time.

Tenant’s personal details. If anything goes wrong during the tenancy such as the tenant leaving without notice, falling into rent arrears or suffering an injury, you should be able to quickly access all of their details.

Inventory. A thorough inventory taken at the start of the tenancy is essential. Make sure this is signed by your tenant, verifying that all information is correct and they agree with the contents of it. It’s advisable you take this to the property every time you conduct an inspection so that any damage to the property can be addressed as it is discovered rather than at the end of the tenancy which can be a few years down the line.

Tenancy deposit protect information. If you are providing your tenants with an Assured Shorthold Tenancy and taking a deposit, you have to legally provide the tenant with details of the scheme you’ve used to protect their deposit and the reference number. When a tenancy ends you will need the deposit ID reference and also your repayment ID in order to release the deposit.

Landlord insurance policy schedule, policy wording and key facts. Emergencies can happen at any time so it is vital you can quickly access your insurer’s details, phone numbers and the level of cover that is provided if you need to make a claim.


Discount Insurance can provide you with comprehensive Landlord Insurance - get a quote by calling 0800 294 4522!
Wednesday, October 04, 2017


Whether you own one property or 5 it is important to keep on top of all the paperwork to ensure that everything is legally in order for all the properties you are letting out and easily accessible if you need it. We have combined a list of ten key pieces of documentation you should have up to date and to hand.

Energy Performance Certificate also known as EPC. Before you can market your property for rent you must be in possession of a valid EPC with the rating clearly displayed on all advertisements of the property. You must have a copy for any prospective tenants to view and one to provide to your tenants when they move in.

Gas Safety Certificate proving that the gas system in the property has been checked by a Gas Safety registered engineer within the last 12 months and is in full working order. This is an annual check that needs to be completed at your property. Ensure you provide your tenants with a copy and if your property is a HMO it needs to be clearly displayed in a communal area.

Fire Risk Assessment form. Under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) you have an obligation to identify potential hazards in the property and take any reasonable steps to minimize the risk of your tenant suffering injury. The best way to prove you have completed this check is to complete a risk assessment form available online here or from your local fire department. It is a good idea to have a qualified safety professional carry out the assessment on your behalf, ensure you keep the form safe and revise every few years or when there’s a change to the hazards in the property.

Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate/Electrical Installation Condition report. The certificate normally issued when a system is installed or updated and the condition report when it’s tested. In an HMO the electrics must legally be checked every five years. In a single let property there is no specific timescale for regular inspections however you are legally obliged to ensure the electrical system is safe. Electrical Safety First recommends inspections on change of tenancy or every five years. You do not need to provide tenants with the paperwork but you might have to prove when the last inspection took place in case of any problems.

'Right to rent’ check paperwork and any correspondence and other information obtained when you verified your tenants identity and their legal status within the UK. In case your tenants are ever proven to be in the UK illegally you must be able to show you took every care to check their status. Remember to make a note of any visa expiry dates so that you can re-check the documents when needed.

Assured Shorthold Tenancy or other tenancy agreement. It is vital that you do not let any tenant move into the property without signing a tenancy agreement. This agreement should demonstrate that the tenant understands their rights and responsibilities and agrees to comply with them. If you ever need or want the tenant to leave the property it is vital you are able to quickly and clearly identify the date the tenancy started and the terms of agreement so you can serve the correct notices at the right time.

Tenant’s personal details. If anything goes wrong during the tenancy such as the tenant leaving without notice, falling into rent arrears or suffering an injury, you should be able to quickly access all of their details.

Inventory. A thorough inventory taken at the start of the tenancy is essential. Make sure this is signed by your tenant, verifying that all information is correct and they agree with the contents of it. It’s advisable you take this to the property every time you conduct an inspection so that any damage to the property can be addressed as it is discovered rather than at the end of the tenancy which can be a few years down the line.

Tenancy deposit protect information. If you are providing your tenants with an Assured Shorthold Tenancy and taking a deposit, you have to legally provide the tenant with details of the scheme you’ve used to protect their deposit and the reference number. When a tenancy ends you will need the deposit ID reference and also your repayment ID in order to release the deposit.

Landlord insurance policy schedule, policy wording and key facts. Emergencies can happen at any time so it is vital you can quickly access your insurer’s details, phone numbers and the level of cover that is provided if you need to make a claim.


Discount Insurance can provide you with comprehensive Landlord Insurance - get a quote by calling 0800 294 4522!

20 September 2017



Falling in love with your dream property is something most buyers will experience, but there is always a risk that your offer won’t be accepted and you’ll lose out.
Katie Griffin, President of National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA Propertymark) says: “Finding your dream property is no mean feat, but when you do eventually find it, the biggest task is keeping hold of it. It’s really important to try and connect with the seller or agents involved, but keep a clear head and make a strong case for why the seller should choose you. An ideal buyer will show that they have done their homework, are clear about how quickly they can move and that they are taking the process seriously.   

Here are a few simple tips you can follow to help secure your perfect property:

Become an expert
It’s important to do your homework before you place an offer so you go into the process comfortable and confident. There is so much information available on the internet about the house buying process and the local area, so take advantage of this. Look into what similar properties in the area have sold for so you’re confident the price you’re offering is the right one.

Get your finances in place
Confirm you can get a mortgage and have enough money for a deposit before you start your search a there’s nothing worse than falling in love with a property you can’t afford. Estate agents will need to verify your ID before solicitors are instructed so remember to bring in your passport and utility bill to provide your proof of funds. Estate agents shouldn’t accept an offer without confirmation that the prospective buyer has their finances in place.

Stress your position
First-time buyers with no chain make for attractive buyers. Your seller may be looking to move as soon as possible and if you’re in good position, you should make that clear as it will make you more attractive than other potential buyers.

Build relationships
Building a relationship with your estate agent will help ensure you’re getting the best possible advice about your purchase. Try and go into their offices rather than having a phone call, and sit down with them to discuss your requirements so that later down the line they can put a face to your name

Act quickly
Sellers are busy and don’t want time wasters. If you like the look of a property, don’t waste time, be the first to get a viewing. Being proactive is one way to show the seller you’re a serious contender.

Putting a price on it
While a bit of negotiating is to be expected, don’t go too low. This can cause tension with the seller and you may end up losing the property altogether if someone else offers a higher bid. You should try to avoid round numbers to prevent making the same bid as someone else.

Protect your purchase
Once your offer has been accepted, ask for the property to be taken off the market straight away. This can minimise the chances of additional offers coming in over and above yours and finding you’ve been trumped.



At Discount Insurance we offer competitive Home Insurance to help give you peace of mind during the winter and throughout the year. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote
Wednesday, September 20, 2017


Falling in love with your dream property is something most buyers will experience, but there is always a risk that your offer won’t be accepted and you’ll lose out.
Katie Griffin, President of National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA Propertymark) says: “Finding your dream property is no mean feat, but when you do eventually find it, the biggest task is keeping hold of it. It’s really important to try and connect with the seller or agents involved, but keep a clear head and make a strong case for why the seller should choose you. An ideal buyer will show that they have done their homework, are clear about how quickly they can move and that they are taking the process seriously.   

Here are a few simple tips you can follow to help secure your perfect property:

Become an expert
It’s important to do your homework before you place an offer so you go into the process comfortable and confident. There is so much information available on the internet about the house buying process and the local area, so take advantage of this. Look into what similar properties in the area have sold for so you’re confident the price you’re offering is the right one.

Get your finances in place
Confirm you can get a mortgage and have enough money for a deposit before you start your search a there’s nothing worse than falling in love with a property you can’t afford. Estate agents will need to verify your ID before solicitors are instructed so remember to bring in your passport and utility bill to provide your proof of funds. Estate agents shouldn’t accept an offer without confirmation that the prospective buyer has their finances in place.

Stress your position
First-time buyers with no chain make for attractive buyers. Your seller may be looking to move as soon as possible and if you’re in good position, you should make that clear as it will make you more attractive than other potential buyers.

Build relationships
Building a relationship with your estate agent will help ensure you’re getting the best possible advice about your purchase. Try and go into their offices rather than having a phone call, and sit down with them to discuss your requirements so that later down the line they can put a face to your name

Act quickly
Sellers are busy and don’t want time wasters. If you like the look of a property, don’t waste time, be the first to get a viewing. Being proactive is one way to show the seller you’re a serious contender.

Putting a price on it
While a bit of negotiating is to be expected, don’t go too low. This can cause tension with the seller and you may end up losing the property altogether if someone else offers a higher bid. You should try to avoid round numbers to prevent making the same bid as someone else.

Protect your purchase
Once your offer has been accepted, ask for the property to be taken off the market straight away. This can minimise the chances of additional offers coming in over and above yours and finding you’ve been trumped.



At Discount Insurance we offer competitive Home Insurance to help give you peace of mind during the winter and throughout the year. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote

06 September 2017

This week we have put together our top tips for all of you students who are heading off to university this month to make the process as easy as can be!

Sort out your paperwork
Every adult tenant in the UK needs to prove they have a Right to Rent, this means you need to make sure you have one of the these documents: Biometric Residence Permit with unlimited leave, UK Passport that is in date, EEA/Swiss national passport/identity card, passport or travel document endorsed with unlimited leave, UK immigration status document endorsed with unlimited leave, EEA/Swiss family member Permanent Residence card or a certificate of naturalisation or registration as a British citizen. If you have not got any of these there are other documents which you may show to prove your status in the UK a full list of which can be found on the gov.uk website. It is a legal responsibility of the landlord to check this and they can be hit with heavy fines if they don’t. Some letting agencies can ask you for things such as 3 months worth of bank statements, a character reference, confirmation of course enrolment or even a guarantor. Make sure you are prepared for these possibilities.

Have your deposit ready
Currently landlords normally ask for a 6 week deposit and your first months rent, ensure you have the money in order to cover these.

Think carefully about your housemates
Often you might get on great with someone in your first year of university and you decide to live together in your second year. Problems can occur when you realise that what your friends do or fail to do causes issues in your house and friendship. These can be simple things such as not washing the dishes but can have a massive impact. So ensure you set ground rules from the start.

Consider the area you are picking
Speak to students on campus, at the open day or find Facebook Freshers groups! Ask to find out what the best location is for your university and what the average rent is in the areas you are considering living in.

Rent with trusted experts
As there are no restrictions to who can become a landlord, this means anyone can rent a property out! To be sure on who you are renting from try to find agents who are affiliated with a professional network such as ARLA. ARLA is the Association of Residential Letting Agents and follow a strict code of conduct, so if anything goes wrong you have a credited body to complain to.

Remember the bills
When you are working out your budget don’t forget to include a budget for your bills! If you can, rent a property which already has bills inclusive as this makes things a lot easier in the long run.

Inventories are important
Make sure you have an accurate inventory of everything in the room/house when you move in. You can even take photos to compare the state of the property when you move out.

Read the small print
Ensure you read the tenancy agreement including any small print before signing the document!

Recently we have been focusing a lot of our attention on students, particularly things such as The Student Guide to paying the bills and Students: Top mistakes that can ruinyour credit score to help you further on your way we have conducted our top tips for renting out a property as a student.

At Discount Insurance we can cover your contents, credit cards, cover you for personal injury and more with our Students Insurance call 0800 294 4522 to get a quick quote!





Wednesday, September 06, 2017
This week we have put together our top tips for all of you students who are heading off to university this month to make the process as easy as can be!

Sort out your paperwork
Every adult tenant in the UK needs to prove they have a Right to Rent, this means you need to make sure you have one of the these documents: Biometric Residence Permit with unlimited leave, UK Passport that is in date, EEA/Swiss national passport/identity card, passport or travel document endorsed with unlimited leave, UK immigration status document endorsed with unlimited leave, EEA/Swiss family member Permanent Residence card or a certificate of naturalisation or registration as a British citizen. If you have not got any of these there are other documents which you may show to prove your status in the UK a full list of which can be found on the gov.uk website. It is a legal responsibility of the landlord to check this and they can be hit with heavy fines if they don’t. Some letting agencies can ask you for things such as 3 months worth of bank statements, a character reference, confirmation of course enrolment or even a guarantor. Make sure you are prepared for these possibilities.

Have your deposit ready
Currently landlords normally ask for a 6 week deposit and your first months rent, ensure you have the money in order to cover these.

Think carefully about your housemates
Often you might get on great with someone in your first year of university and you decide to live together in your second year. Problems can occur when you realise that what your friends do or fail to do causes issues in your house and friendship. These can be simple things such as not washing the dishes but can have a massive impact. So ensure you set ground rules from the start.

Consider the area you are picking
Speak to students on campus, at the open day or find Facebook Freshers groups! Ask to find out what the best location is for your university and what the average rent is in the areas you are considering living in.

Rent with trusted experts
As there are no restrictions to who can become a landlord, this means anyone can rent a property out! To be sure on who you are renting from try to find agents who are affiliated with a professional network such as ARLA. ARLA is the Association of Residential Letting Agents and follow a strict code of conduct, so if anything goes wrong you have a credited body to complain to.

Remember the bills
When you are working out your budget don’t forget to include a budget for your bills! If you can, rent a property which already has bills inclusive as this makes things a lot easier in the long run.

Inventories are important
Make sure you have an accurate inventory of everything in the room/house when you move in. You can even take photos to compare the state of the property when you move out.

Read the small print
Ensure you read the tenancy agreement including any small print before signing the document!

Recently we have been focusing a lot of our attention on students, particularly things such as The Student Guide to paying the bills and Students: Top mistakes that can ruinyour credit score to help you further on your way we have conducted our top tips for renting out a property as a student.

At Discount Insurance we can cover your contents, credit cards, cover you for personal injury and more with our Students Insurance call 0800 294 4522 to get a quick quote!