15 March 2017


Permitted development rights, which stem from a general planning consent granted not by the local authority but by parliament, generally allow you to add space and value to your home without the need to spend time and money obtaining planning consent, but what is permitted?

The history of your house must be checked before undertaking any external alternations, in order to determine whether your permitted development rights have been removed by the council as the local planning authority.

  • Restrictions - If your permitted development rights have been removed, you will have to submit a planning application for any alterations that you want to make to your property that would not normally require the council’s consent. It is highly recommended that you check with the local planning authority before making any alterations.

  • Garage conversion - Many homeowners choose to convert the garage into an additional bedroom or bathroom, and the good news is that consent is generally not required for a garage conversion, providing the work is internal and does not involve enlarging the building.

  • Loft conversion - You can usually make alterations to your loft without submitting an application for planning permission as long as the size allowance is not exceeded (check your local council’s website). No extension should be higher than the highest part of the roof or extend beyond the plane of the existing roof slope, while materials used should be similar in appearance to those used on the existing house. Balconies or raised platforms are generally not allowed without planning permission.

  • Extension - An extension or addition to your house is an ideal way to add space and value to your home. A rear or side extension is often considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, especially if it is a single-storey extension of no more than four metres tall and as long as it is no more than half the area of land around the ‘original house’.

  • Outbuildings - Standard size garages, sheds and other outbuildings are generally considered to be permitted development.

  • If in doubt, check it out - Permitted development rights can be complex and so if you are in any doubt you should seek further information on permitted development rights by visiting the Planning Portal.


Discount Insurance provides Home Insurance policies from a range of leading UK insurers, allowing you to find the right cover to meet your needs. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today! 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Permitted development rights, which stem from a general planning consent granted not by the local authority but by parliament, generally allow you to add space and value to your home without the need to spend time and money obtaining planning consent, but what is permitted?

The history of your house must be checked before undertaking any external alternations, in order to determine whether your permitted development rights have been removed by the council as the local planning authority.

  • Restrictions - If your permitted development rights have been removed, you will have to submit a planning application for any alterations that you want to make to your property that would not normally require the council’s consent. It is highly recommended that you check with the local planning authority before making any alterations.

  • Garage conversion - Many homeowners choose to convert the garage into an additional bedroom or bathroom, and the good news is that consent is generally not required for a garage conversion, providing the work is internal and does not involve enlarging the building.

  • Loft conversion - You can usually make alterations to your loft without submitting an application for planning permission as long as the size allowance is not exceeded (check your local council’s website). No extension should be higher than the highest part of the roof or extend beyond the plane of the existing roof slope, while materials used should be similar in appearance to those used on the existing house. Balconies or raised platforms are generally not allowed without planning permission.

  • Extension - An extension or addition to your house is an ideal way to add space and value to your home. A rear or side extension is often considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, especially if it is a single-storey extension of no more than four metres tall and as long as it is no more than half the area of land around the ‘original house’.

  • Outbuildings - Standard size garages, sheds and other outbuildings are generally considered to be permitted development.

  • If in doubt, check it out - Permitted development rights can be complex and so if you are in any doubt you should seek further information on permitted development rights by visiting the Planning Portal.


Discount Insurance provides Home Insurance policies from a range of leading UK insurers, allowing you to find the right cover to meet your needs. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today! 

23 February 2017


Advice from Mum and Dad is something we carry with us like the bible in our minds. Being “conservative” with cash when you’re young is smart, for example, but millennials need risk to build long-term wealth.
As much as we trust the personal advice of these VIPs in our lives, could they perhaps be mistaken about money?


Here are three big financial misconceptions to watch out for.

  • Pay others before you pay yourself
Paying money you owe, like bills, when they are due is pretty much a no-brainer. If you don’t, your credit could suffer (which means you will suffer too when you aren’t approved for a loan).

However, it’s very different to pay other people for other things before you “pay yourself”. How can you save a little extra money each month if paying everyone is so important?

“At least after you’ve covered your debts, you should be paying yourself first, before you shell out on other spending” said David Bach, author of The Automatic Millionaire.

He suggests regularly moving approximately one hour a day of your pay, or approximately 12.5% of your pretax income, into an investment savings account.


  • You’re throwing away money on rent
Renting gives you flexibility as you pursue career advancement but it allows you to avoid certain financial drains. 

Aspiring homeowners tend to forget about the “add on” expenses of ownership, such as insurance, taxes, home maintenance and sometimes association costs.

Home maintenance expenses alone can cost anywhere from 1 to 4% of your home’s annual value each year. “People often say that buying a home was the best investment they ever made,” said Neela Hummel, of  financial planning firm Abacus Wealth Partners. “The problem is that their return as investors is often worse than they think.”


  • Avoid credit cards like the plague
“Many young adults are alarmed by how deeply in debt their parents became and don’t want to follow in their footsteps”, David Roberton, publisher of the Nilson Report, told the New York Times.
Establishing responsibility by opening a card early in life is still instrumental in building credit history. Good credit history means a good credit score, and that’s the springboard to obtaining loans for big ticket purchases, like homes.

Even if a home purchase is years away, building credit doesn’t happen overnight and having good credit is necessary to refinance a student loan or finance a car.


Discount Insurance provides millennials with competitive insurance to help protect their possessions. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today!

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Advice from Mum and Dad is something we carry with us like the bible in our minds. Being “conservative” with cash when you’re young is smart, for example, but millennials need risk to build long-term wealth.
As much as we trust the personal advice of these VIPs in our lives, could they perhaps be mistaken about money?


Here are three big financial misconceptions to watch out for.

  • Pay others before you pay yourself
Paying money you owe, like bills, when they are due is pretty much a no-brainer. If you don’t, your credit could suffer (which means you will suffer too when you aren’t approved for a loan).

However, it’s very different to pay other people for other things before you “pay yourself”. How can you save a little extra money each month if paying everyone is so important?

“At least after you’ve covered your debts, you should be paying yourself first, before you shell out on other spending” said David Bach, author of The Automatic Millionaire.

He suggests regularly moving approximately one hour a day of your pay, or approximately 12.5% of your pretax income, into an investment savings account.


  • You’re throwing away money on rent
Renting gives you flexibility as you pursue career advancement but it allows you to avoid certain financial drains. 

Aspiring homeowners tend to forget about the “add on” expenses of ownership, such as insurance, taxes, home maintenance and sometimes association costs.

Home maintenance expenses alone can cost anywhere from 1 to 4% of your home’s annual value each year. “People often say that buying a home was the best investment they ever made,” said Neela Hummel, of  financial planning firm Abacus Wealth Partners. “The problem is that their return as investors is often worse than they think.”


  • Avoid credit cards like the plague
“Many young adults are alarmed by how deeply in debt their parents became and don’t want to follow in their footsteps”, David Roberton, publisher of the Nilson Report, told the New York Times.
Establishing responsibility by opening a card early in life is still instrumental in building credit history. Good credit history means a good credit score, and that’s the springboard to obtaining loans for big ticket purchases, like homes.

Even if a home purchase is years away, building credit doesn’t happen overnight and having good credit is necessary to refinance a student loan or finance a car.


Discount Insurance provides millennials with competitive insurance to help protect their possessions. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today!

25 January 2017



Are you dreaming of a white winter? Have a frozen fairytale adventure by visiting these European destinations where snow is (almost) certain.
In the UK a sprinkling of the icy stuff is never guaranteed, so here are our suggestions to help you improve your chances of witnessing a white!

-  St. Petersburg, Russia 

This Russian city has loads of history to offer and visiting the former imperial capital during winter guarantees you an icy reception.

The rivers are frozen, shop windows illuminated by flickering candles and the decorative domes of orthodox churches framed by crisp a blue sky.

Contrary to its fame, there’s nothing stark or austere about the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg’s headline attraction. Spare a day or two to tour some of the 1,000 plus opulent rooms that form part of the sprawling Hermitage art and culture museum.

-  Tromso, Norway   

A gateway city to the Arctic Circle, Tromso in Norway is northerly enough to be sprinkled with snow in winter.

A coating of the snow certainly helps brighten gloomy days, when the sun doesn’t even peep above the horizon. No daylight means more opportunity to see the Northern Lights, the real draw for visitors.

Unless the aurora is strong, you’ll need to escape city streetlights. Join a hunt with small groups of people, chase the lights by heading in land to secret spots known for their clear skies.

-  Val Thorens, France

Hitting Europe’s ski resorts early in the season can be a gamble, but at 2,300m, the continent’s highest village ski resort is a good bet.

The scenery alone gets pulses pumping, not to mention 373 miles of slopes that form the Three Valleys system with Courcheve, Meribel, and Les Menuires.

You can ski from your doorstep at the purpose-built resort, set in a valley surrounded by a horseshoe of dagger-edged peaks, but it’s also possible to soak up sights from above on an Aerial Paramotor Flight.

-  Bolzano, Italy

Sitting in the shadow of the Dolomites, high up in the South Tyrol, this mountain fringed town is a fairytale winter escape.

Nearby glaciers were responsible for the 5,300 year preservation of one of the region’s most important finds. Discovered accidentally by hikers in 1991, Ice Man Otzi is on display at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology.

-  Kittila, Finland

Slap bang in Santa-land Finnish Lapland’s Kittila ski region double up as a workshop for the bearded gift bearer and his jovial elves. The vital ingredient here is snow and there’s lots of it.

Temperatures hover around minus in winter, and 24h darkness is interrupted only by displays of the Northern Lights.

Sleep in an ice hotel and eat at an ice-sculpted restaurant in the Snow Village, made from 20 million kilos of snow and 350,000 kilos of ice. Wrap up in a padded boiler suit for reindeer rides and skidoo safaris or husky-led adventures.


This winter while travelling in search for snow filled European cities, make sure to protect yourself with our Travel Insurance, with a range of travel insurance options, leaving you with peace of mind, as well as more money to spend on holiday luxuries! – For a quick quote give us a call on 0800 294 4522 today!

Wednesday, January 25, 2017


Are you dreaming of a white winter? Have a frozen fairytale adventure by visiting these European destinations where snow is (almost) certain.
In the UK a sprinkling of the icy stuff is never guaranteed, so here are our suggestions to help you improve your chances of witnessing a white!

-  St. Petersburg, Russia 

This Russian city has loads of history to offer and visiting the former imperial capital during winter guarantees you an icy reception.

The rivers are frozen, shop windows illuminated by flickering candles and the decorative domes of orthodox churches framed by crisp a blue sky.

Contrary to its fame, there’s nothing stark or austere about the Winter Palace, St. Petersburg’s headline attraction. Spare a day or two to tour some of the 1,000 plus opulent rooms that form part of the sprawling Hermitage art and culture museum.

-  Tromso, Norway   

A gateway city to the Arctic Circle, Tromso in Norway is northerly enough to be sprinkled with snow in winter.

A coating of the snow certainly helps brighten gloomy days, when the sun doesn’t even peep above the horizon. No daylight means more opportunity to see the Northern Lights, the real draw for visitors.

Unless the aurora is strong, you’ll need to escape city streetlights. Join a hunt with small groups of people, chase the lights by heading in land to secret spots known for their clear skies.

-  Val Thorens, France

Hitting Europe’s ski resorts early in the season can be a gamble, but at 2,300m, the continent’s highest village ski resort is a good bet.

The scenery alone gets pulses pumping, not to mention 373 miles of slopes that form the Three Valleys system with Courcheve, Meribel, and Les Menuires.

You can ski from your doorstep at the purpose-built resort, set in a valley surrounded by a horseshoe of dagger-edged peaks, but it’s also possible to soak up sights from above on an Aerial Paramotor Flight.

-  Bolzano, Italy

Sitting in the shadow of the Dolomites, high up in the South Tyrol, this mountain fringed town is a fairytale winter escape.

Nearby glaciers were responsible for the 5,300 year preservation of one of the region’s most important finds. Discovered accidentally by hikers in 1991, Ice Man Otzi is on display at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology.

-  Kittila, Finland

Slap bang in Santa-land Finnish Lapland’s Kittila ski region double up as a workshop for the bearded gift bearer and his jovial elves. The vital ingredient here is snow and there’s lots of it.

Temperatures hover around minus in winter, and 24h darkness is interrupted only by displays of the Northern Lights.

Sleep in an ice hotel and eat at an ice-sculpted restaurant in the Snow Village, made from 20 million kilos of snow and 350,000 kilos of ice. Wrap up in a padded boiler suit for reindeer rides and skidoo safaris or husky-led adventures.


This winter while travelling in search for snow filled European cities, make sure to protect yourself with our Travel Insurance, with a range of travel insurance options, leaving you with peace of mind, as well as more money to spend on holiday luxuries! – For a quick quote give us a call on 0800 294 4522 today!

11 January 2017



In the simplest terms, a property of ‘non-standard construction’ is one that is not made of brick or stone walls, with a slate or tiled roof.

There are many different types of non-standard homes, for example those built purely from timber to concrete and prefabricated homes.

Many prefabricated homes were built in the UK during and after the war as a form of affordable housing. However, concrete is not as durable as brick or stone and properties were quickly suffering from crumbling concrete with cracks appearing.

This made it very difficult to get both a mortgage and insurance to purchase or live in these types of properties.

At Discount Insurance things are different. We can provide cover on a range of non-standard properties and features including up to 100% flat roofs, glass roofs, wooden houses, cob-tiled roofs, asbestos construction, listed buildings and much more.

We like non-standard properties so much that we’ve put together a list of the top 10 things to consider when buying a non-standard home:

1.  Ensure you budget enough to purchase the property, as surveyors’, mortgage and legal fees may be higher than normal.  
2.   Either have the cash ready to buy the property outright or find a specialist lender that is happy to lend on the property before you make any offers. 
3.   Make sure the property is priced at a discount to reflect the difficulties in raising finance and insurance, and try to negotiate this down if not.
4. Most non-standard properties are sold at auction so don’t make an offer on a property unless you are sure you know what it’s made of. You will need to provide exact details to both your mortgage lender and insurance provider.
5.   Make sure you secure quotes for insuring the property from a company who understands the problems that the property may suffer and should therefore give you cover more suited to your needs. Contact us today for a quick quote on 0800 294 4522.
6.  Secure a specialist legal company to carry out the conveyancing, usually someone local to the area that has experience of additional questions that need to be asked.  
7. If the property needs renovating make sure you secure the help of builders with experience of renovating properties like yours, don’t just go for the cheapest quote and ensure you agree the work that needs doing and any guarantees via a contract.  
8. Find out what the bills will be, for example will the heating bills cost more or less due to the different materials used for the property? 
9. Have a specialist survey carried out on the property and ideally go around with the surveyor so you are clear about the problems the property may or may not have. 
10. Understand that when you come to sell the property, unless you have renovated the property to standard construction, it may take a little longer to attract a buyer.

Don’t be put off by a property if it is of non-standard construction, although there are additional things to consider before purchasing a property of this kind, it will be worth it if it’s your dream home!

Wednesday, January 11, 2017


In the simplest terms, a property of ‘non-standard construction’ is one that is not made of brick or stone walls, with a slate or tiled roof.

There are many different types of non-standard homes, for example those built purely from timber to concrete and prefabricated homes.

Many prefabricated homes were built in the UK during and after the war as a form of affordable housing. However, concrete is not as durable as brick or stone and properties were quickly suffering from crumbling concrete with cracks appearing.

This made it very difficult to get both a mortgage and insurance to purchase or live in these types of properties.

At Discount Insurance things are different. We can provide cover on a range of non-standard properties and features including up to 100% flat roofs, glass roofs, wooden houses, cob-tiled roofs, asbestos construction, listed buildings and much more.

We like non-standard properties so much that we’ve put together a list of the top 10 things to consider when buying a non-standard home:

1.  Ensure you budget enough to purchase the property, as surveyors’, mortgage and legal fees may be higher than normal.  
2.   Either have the cash ready to buy the property outright or find a specialist lender that is happy to lend on the property before you make any offers. 
3.   Make sure the property is priced at a discount to reflect the difficulties in raising finance and insurance, and try to negotiate this down if not.
4. Most non-standard properties are sold at auction so don’t make an offer on a property unless you are sure you know what it’s made of. You will need to provide exact details to both your mortgage lender and insurance provider.
5.   Make sure you secure quotes for insuring the property from a company who understands the problems that the property may suffer and should therefore give you cover more suited to your needs. Contact us today for a quick quote on 0800 294 4522.
6.  Secure a specialist legal company to carry out the conveyancing, usually someone local to the area that has experience of additional questions that need to be asked.  
7. If the property needs renovating make sure you secure the help of builders with experience of renovating properties like yours, don’t just go for the cheapest quote and ensure you agree the work that needs doing and any guarantees via a contract.  
8. Find out what the bills will be, for example will the heating bills cost more or less due to the different materials used for the property? 
9. Have a specialist survey carried out on the property and ideally go around with the surveyor so you are clear about the problems the property may or may not have. 
10. Understand that when you come to sell the property, unless you have renovated the property to standard construction, it may take a little longer to attract a buyer.

Don’t be put off by a property if it is of non-standard construction, although there are additional things to consider before purchasing a property of this kind, it will be worth it if it’s your dream home!

04 January 2017



From mortgages and savings to tax returns and insurance, here are our top tips on saving money in the 2017.


Mortgages

2016 was a pretty good year for many people taking out a mortgage, with record low fixed-rate home loans on offer.  Last month however, HSBC withdrew its very competitive 0.99% two-year fixed.

Mortgage rates will almost certainly rise in the coming months according to financial experts, and mortgage-holders should consult their advisers now about fixing their rates before increases occur.

The best-buy two-year fixes include Norwich & Peterborough building society’s 1.39% deal (maximum loan-to-value of 65%) and Yorkshire building society’s 1.44% rate (maximum LTV of 85%), according to Moneyfacts.co.uk.

For five-year fixes, rates start at 1.99% from Leeds building society. If you have a 10%-plus deposit you can fix for five years at 2.99% courtesy of West Bromwich building society.


Energy bills

Two-thirds of UK households are estimated to be on their energy supplier’s ‘standard’ gas and electricity tariff and could therefore be overpaying by £200 year – more if you live in a large house.

Our advice would be to switch to a fixed-price tariff – it can take as little as five minutes to switch.

Co-Op Energy is currently offering an £850-a-year fixed price tariff that runs until February 2018, Moneysupermarket also has an exclusive deal with Flow Energy which is a fixed tariff until the end of March 2018 and costs an average of £877 a year.


Direct debits

Check your monthly direct debits! Are you still paying for something you thought you had a cancelled?

It’s surprising how much this catches people out. Are you still paying for an old gym or AA membership you no longer use? Check all of your monthly direct debits and standing orders and cancel any you no longer require! 


Tax Returns

Last year 890,000 people were fined £100 for completing their tax return late, plus the addition of punitive interest on the money owed.

If you still haven’t filled it three months after the 31 January deadline then the fines can add up even more, with daily penalties of £10 per day, up to a maximum of £900 added.

Don’t throw your money away – get it in on time!


Home Insurance

Renewing year after year with the same insurer can lead to you paying through the nose for your home insurance when compared to the prices elsewhere on the market. 

Before you renew with your current insurer, get a quick quote on your home insurance from Discount Insurance and we’ll try and save you money on your existing premium!



Wednesday, January 04, 2017


From mortgages and savings to tax returns and insurance, here are our top tips on saving money in the 2017.


Mortgages

2016 was a pretty good year for many people taking out a mortgage, with record low fixed-rate home loans on offer.  Last month however, HSBC withdrew its very competitive 0.99% two-year fixed.

Mortgage rates will almost certainly rise in the coming months according to financial experts, and mortgage-holders should consult their advisers now about fixing their rates before increases occur.

The best-buy two-year fixes include Norwich & Peterborough building society’s 1.39% deal (maximum loan-to-value of 65%) and Yorkshire building society’s 1.44% rate (maximum LTV of 85%), according to Moneyfacts.co.uk.

For five-year fixes, rates start at 1.99% from Leeds building society. If you have a 10%-plus deposit you can fix for five years at 2.99% courtesy of West Bromwich building society.


Energy bills

Two-thirds of UK households are estimated to be on their energy supplier’s ‘standard’ gas and electricity tariff and could therefore be overpaying by £200 year – more if you live in a large house.

Our advice would be to switch to a fixed-price tariff – it can take as little as five minutes to switch.

Co-Op Energy is currently offering an £850-a-year fixed price tariff that runs until February 2018, Moneysupermarket also has an exclusive deal with Flow Energy which is a fixed tariff until the end of March 2018 and costs an average of £877 a year.


Direct debits

Check your monthly direct debits! Are you still paying for something you thought you had a cancelled?

It’s surprising how much this catches people out. Are you still paying for an old gym or AA membership you no longer use? Check all of your monthly direct debits and standing orders and cancel any you no longer require! 


Tax Returns

Last year 890,000 people were fined £100 for completing their tax return late, plus the addition of punitive interest on the money owed.

If you still haven’t filled it three months after the 31 January deadline then the fines can add up even more, with daily penalties of £10 per day, up to a maximum of £900 added.

Don’t throw your money away – get it in on time!


Home Insurance

Renewing year after year with the same insurer can lead to you paying through the nose for your home insurance when compared to the prices elsewhere on the market. 

Before you renew with your current insurer, get a quick quote on your home insurance from Discount Insurance and we’ll try and save you money on your existing premium!



14 December 2016


  
As the days grow short and the scarves grow longer, Christmas shoppers begin to count the hours until the big day. Christmas markets are always a good alternative to the busy atmosphere in shopping centres.

We’ve picked out a few of our favourites, to help make this a bother-free Christmas worth remembering.


York

The St Nicholas Fayre market boasts food aplenty, especially dishes that once roamed wild and free. Venison, wild boar and suckling pig share menu space with more exotic fare, such as kangaroo and ostrich. Expect plenty of folk in Victorian dress, carol singers en masse, and the smell of Christmas cooking wafting through the streets surrounding the York Minster.


Manchester

The Manchester Christmas market is an award-winning event, it won the ‘Best Market Authorities’ award, and is a month-long celebration of all things yule. Running since 1998, it has been known to pull in close to 900,000 visitors. Across 200 stalls, the market flogs everything from cosmetics to toys, with plenty of food on offer, mulled wine and cinnamon treats guaranteed. 


Belfast

Belfast’s own Christmas festival is particularly famous for the food, with Bratwurst and paella high on the menu. The non-edibles on sale at the Christmas Continental Market come from even more exotic climes: the Kenyan carpentry stalls look like they might furnish someone with a particular handsome present this year. There is also plenty on offer for kids as the Santa grotto is always something of a centrepiece.


Bath

Located in the snug streets around Bath Abbey and the Roman Baths, the Bath Christmas Market is housed in a collection of wooden chalets, with stalls specializing in handmade gifts and Yuletide nibbles. Among the more esoteric booths associated with this event is Bollywood Christmas bringing some Mumbai bling to your tree this year.


London (Hyde Park)

The popular London Christmas market is one of the countries most visited winter markets. Indulge in the annual gathering of winter markets, festive fairground rides, ice skating, grottos and glühwein galore.


 Oxford

Oxford Christmas market is a Germanic event, specializing in local arts and crafts with a particular emphasis on music performed by local musicians in the Oxford Castle. The market and festivities take place at Oxford Castle, affording visitors the chance for a stop of sightseeing once they’ve got the stockings sorted.


Christmas is a great period of the year to spend time with your family, whether you choose to do it in the winter markets or anywhere else, Discount Insurance offers competitive Home Insurance. Give us a quick call on 020 847 8000 today.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

  
As the days grow short and the scarves grow longer, Christmas shoppers begin to count the hours until the big day. Christmas markets are always a good alternative to the busy atmosphere in shopping centres.

We’ve picked out a few of our favourites, to help make this a bother-free Christmas worth remembering.


York

The St Nicholas Fayre market boasts food aplenty, especially dishes that once roamed wild and free. Venison, wild boar and suckling pig share menu space with more exotic fare, such as kangaroo and ostrich. Expect plenty of folk in Victorian dress, carol singers en masse, and the smell of Christmas cooking wafting through the streets surrounding the York Minster.


Manchester

The Manchester Christmas market is an award-winning event, it won the ‘Best Market Authorities’ award, and is a month-long celebration of all things yule. Running since 1998, it has been known to pull in close to 900,000 visitors. Across 200 stalls, the market flogs everything from cosmetics to toys, with plenty of food on offer, mulled wine and cinnamon treats guaranteed. 


Belfast

Belfast’s own Christmas festival is particularly famous for the food, with Bratwurst and paella high on the menu. The non-edibles on sale at the Christmas Continental Market come from even more exotic climes: the Kenyan carpentry stalls look like they might furnish someone with a particular handsome present this year. There is also plenty on offer for kids as the Santa grotto is always something of a centrepiece.


Bath

Located in the snug streets around Bath Abbey and the Roman Baths, the Bath Christmas Market is housed in a collection of wooden chalets, with stalls specializing in handmade gifts and Yuletide nibbles. Among the more esoteric booths associated with this event is Bollywood Christmas bringing some Mumbai bling to your tree this year.


London (Hyde Park)

The popular London Christmas market is one of the countries most visited winter markets. Indulge in the annual gathering of winter markets, festive fairground rides, ice skating, grottos and glühwein galore.


 Oxford

Oxford Christmas market is a Germanic event, specializing in local arts and crafts with a particular emphasis on music performed by local musicians in the Oxford Castle. The market and festivities take place at Oxford Castle, affording visitors the chance for a stop of sightseeing once they’ve got the stockings sorted.


Christmas is a great period of the year to spend time with your family, whether you choose to do it in the winter markets or anywhere else, Discount Insurance offers competitive Home Insurance. Give us a quick call on 020 847 8000 today.