04 October 2017



Whether you own one property or 5 it is important to keep on top of all the paperwork to ensure that everything is legally in order for all the properties you are letting out and easily accessible if you need it. We have combined a list of ten key pieces of documentation you should have up to date and to hand.

Energy Performance Certificate also known as EPC. Before you can market your property for rent you must be in possession of a valid EPC with the rating clearly displayed on all advertisements of the property. You must have a copy for any prospective tenants to view and one to provide to your tenants when they move in.

Gas Safety Certificate proving that the gas system in the property has been checked by a Gas Safety registered engineer within the last 12 months and is in full working order. This is an annual check that needs to be completed at your property. Ensure you provide your tenants with a copy and if your property is a HMO it needs to be clearly displayed in a communal area.

Fire Risk Assessment form. Under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) you have an obligation to identify potential hazards in the property and take any reasonable steps to minimize the risk of your tenant suffering injury. The best way to prove you have completed this check is to complete a risk assessment form available online here or from your local fire department. It is a good idea to have a qualified safety professional carry out the assessment on your behalf, ensure you keep the form safe and revise every few years or when there’s a change to the hazards in the property.

Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate/Electrical Installation Condition report. The certificate normally issued when a system is installed or updated and the condition report when it’s tested. In an HMO the electrics must legally be checked every five years. In a single let property there is no specific timescale for regular inspections however you are legally obliged to ensure the electrical system is safe. Electrical Safety First recommends inspections on change of tenancy or every five years. You do not need to provide tenants with the paperwork but you might have to prove when the last inspection took place in case of any problems.

'Right to rent’ check paperwork and any correspondence and other information obtained when you verified your tenants identity and their legal status within the UK. In case your tenants are ever proven to be in the UK illegally you must be able to show you took every care to check their status. Remember to make a note of any visa expiry dates so that you can re-check the documents when needed.

Assured Shorthold Tenancy or other tenancy agreement. It is vital that you do not let any tenant move into the property without signing a tenancy agreement. This agreement should demonstrate that the tenant understands their rights and responsibilities and agrees to comply with them. If you ever need or want the tenant to leave the property it is vital you are able to quickly and clearly identify the date the tenancy started and the terms of agreement so you can serve the correct notices at the right time.

Tenant’s personal details. If anything goes wrong during the tenancy such as the tenant leaving without notice, falling into rent arrears or suffering an injury, you should be able to quickly access all of their details.

Inventory. A thorough inventory taken at the start of the tenancy is essential. Make sure this is signed by your tenant, verifying that all information is correct and they agree with the contents of it. It’s advisable you take this to the property every time you conduct an inspection so that any damage to the property can be addressed as it is discovered rather than at the end of the tenancy which can be a few years down the line.

Tenancy deposit protect information. If you are providing your tenants with an Assured Shorthold Tenancy and taking a deposit, you have to legally provide the tenant with details of the scheme you’ve used to protect their deposit and the reference number. When a tenancy ends you will need the deposit ID reference and also your repayment ID in order to release the deposit.

Landlord insurance policy schedule, policy wording and key facts. Emergencies can happen at any time so it is vital you can quickly access your insurer’s details, phone numbers and the level of cover that is provided if you need to make a claim.


Discount Insurance can provide you with comprehensive Landlord Insurance - get a quote by calling 0800 294 4522!
Wednesday, October 04, 2017


Whether you own one property or 5 it is important to keep on top of all the paperwork to ensure that everything is legally in order for all the properties you are letting out and easily accessible if you need it. We have combined a list of ten key pieces of documentation you should have up to date and to hand.

Energy Performance Certificate also known as EPC. Before you can market your property for rent you must be in possession of a valid EPC with the rating clearly displayed on all advertisements of the property. You must have a copy for any prospective tenants to view and one to provide to your tenants when they move in.

Gas Safety Certificate proving that the gas system in the property has been checked by a Gas Safety registered engineer within the last 12 months and is in full working order. This is an annual check that needs to be completed at your property. Ensure you provide your tenants with a copy and if your property is a HMO it needs to be clearly displayed in a communal area.

Fire Risk Assessment form. Under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) you have an obligation to identify potential hazards in the property and take any reasonable steps to minimize the risk of your tenant suffering injury. The best way to prove you have completed this check is to complete a risk assessment form available online here or from your local fire department. It is a good idea to have a qualified safety professional carry out the assessment on your behalf, ensure you keep the form safe and revise every few years or when there’s a change to the hazards in the property.

Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate/Electrical Installation Condition report. The certificate normally issued when a system is installed or updated and the condition report when it’s tested. In an HMO the electrics must legally be checked every five years. In a single let property there is no specific timescale for regular inspections however you are legally obliged to ensure the electrical system is safe. Electrical Safety First recommends inspections on change of tenancy or every five years. You do not need to provide tenants with the paperwork but you might have to prove when the last inspection took place in case of any problems.

'Right to rent’ check paperwork and any correspondence and other information obtained when you verified your tenants identity and their legal status within the UK. In case your tenants are ever proven to be in the UK illegally you must be able to show you took every care to check their status. Remember to make a note of any visa expiry dates so that you can re-check the documents when needed.

Assured Shorthold Tenancy or other tenancy agreement. It is vital that you do not let any tenant move into the property without signing a tenancy agreement. This agreement should demonstrate that the tenant understands their rights and responsibilities and agrees to comply with them. If you ever need or want the tenant to leave the property it is vital you are able to quickly and clearly identify the date the tenancy started and the terms of agreement so you can serve the correct notices at the right time.

Tenant’s personal details. If anything goes wrong during the tenancy such as the tenant leaving without notice, falling into rent arrears or suffering an injury, you should be able to quickly access all of their details.

Inventory. A thorough inventory taken at the start of the tenancy is essential. Make sure this is signed by your tenant, verifying that all information is correct and they agree with the contents of it. It’s advisable you take this to the property every time you conduct an inspection so that any damage to the property can be addressed as it is discovered rather than at the end of the tenancy which can be a few years down the line.

Tenancy deposit protect information. If you are providing your tenants with an Assured Shorthold Tenancy and taking a deposit, you have to legally provide the tenant with details of the scheme you’ve used to protect their deposit and the reference number. When a tenancy ends you will need the deposit ID reference and also your repayment ID in order to release the deposit.

Landlord insurance policy schedule, policy wording and key facts. Emergencies can happen at any time so it is vital you can quickly access your insurer’s details, phone numbers and the level of cover that is provided if you need to make a claim.


Discount Insurance can provide you with comprehensive Landlord Insurance - get a quote by calling 0800 294 4522!

20 September 2017



Falling in love with your dream property is something most buyers will experience, but there is always a risk that your offer won’t be accepted and you’ll lose out.
Katie Griffin, President of National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA Propertymark) says: “Finding your dream property is no mean feat, but when you do eventually find it, the biggest task is keeping hold of it. It’s really important to try and connect with the seller or agents involved, but keep a clear head and make a strong case for why the seller should choose you. An ideal buyer will show that they have done their homework, are clear about how quickly they can move and that they are taking the process seriously.   

Here are a few simple tips you can follow to help secure your perfect property:

Become an expert
It’s important to do your homework before you place an offer so you go into the process comfortable and confident. There is so much information available on the internet about the house buying process and the local area, so take advantage of this. Look into what similar properties in the area have sold for so you’re confident the price you’re offering is the right one.

Get your finances in place
Confirm you can get a mortgage and have enough money for a deposit before you start your search a there’s nothing worse than falling in love with a property you can’t afford. Estate agents will need to verify your ID before solicitors are instructed so remember to bring in your passport and utility bill to provide your proof of funds. Estate agents shouldn’t accept an offer without confirmation that the prospective buyer has their finances in place.

Stress your position
First-time buyers with no chain make for attractive buyers. Your seller may be looking to move as soon as possible and if you’re in good position, you should make that clear as it will make you more attractive than other potential buyers.

Build relationships
Building a relationship with your estate agent will help ensure you’re getting the best possible advice about your purchase. Try and go into their offices rather than having a phone call, and sit down with them to discuss your requirements so that later down the line they can put a face to your name

Act quickly
Sellers are busy and don’t want time wasters. If you like the look of a property, don’t waste time, be the first to get a viewing. Being proactive is one way to show the seller you’re a serious contender.

Putting a price on it
While a bit of negotiating is to be expected, don’t go too low. This can cause tension with the seller and you may end up losing the property altogether if someone else offers a higher bid. You should try to avoid round numbers to prevent making the same bid as someone else.

Protect your purchase
Once your offer has been accepted, ask for the property to be taken off the market straight away. This can minimise the chances of additional offers coming in over and above yours and finding you’ve been trumped.



At Discount Insurance we offer competitive Home Insurance to help give you peace of mind during the winter and throughout the year. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote
Wednesday, September 20, 2017


Falling in love with your dream property is something most buyers will experience, but there is always a risk that your offer won’t be accepted and you’ll lose out.
Katie Griffin, President of National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA Propertymark) says: “Finding your dream property is no mean feat, but when you do eventually find it, the biggest task is keeping hold of it. It’s really important to try and connect with the seller or agents involved, but keep a clear head and make a strong case for why the seller should choose you. An ideal buyer will show that they have done their homework, are clear about how quickly they can move and that they are taking the process seriously.   

Here are a few simple tips you can follow to help secure your perfect property:

Become an expert
It’s important to do your homework before you place an offer so you go into the process comfortable and confident. There is so much information available on the internet about the house buying process and the local area, so take advantage of this. Look into what similar properties in the area have sold for so you’re confident the price you’re offering is the right one.

Get your finances in place
Confirm you can get a mortgage and have enough money for a deposit before you start your search a there’s nothing worse than falling in love with a property you can’t afford. Estate agents will need to verify your ID before solicitors are instructed so remember to bring in your passport and utility bill to provide your proof of funds. Estate agents shouldn’t accept an offer without confirmation that the prospective buyer has their finances in place.

Stress your position
First-time buyers with no chain make for attractive buyers. Your seller may be looking to move as soon as possible and if you’re in good position, you should make that clear as it will make you more attractive than other potential buyers.

Build relationships
Building a relationship with your estate agent will help ensure you’re getting the best possible advice about your purchase. Try and go into their offices rather than having a phone call, and sit down with them to discuss your requirements so that later down the line they can put a face to your name

Act quickly
Sellers are busy and don’t want time wasters. If you like the look of a property, don’t waste time, be the first to get a viewing. Being proactive is one way to show the seller you’re a serious contender.

Putting a price on it
While a bit of negotiating is to be expected, don’t go too low. This can cause tension with the seller and you may end up losing the property altogether if someone else offers a higher bid. You should try to avoid round numbers to prevent making the same bid as someone else.

Protect your purchase
Once your offer has been accepted, ask for the property to be taken off the market straight away. This can minimise the chances of additional offers coming in over and above yours and finding you’ve been trumped.



At Discount Insurance we offer competitive Home Insurance to help give you peace of mind during the winter and throughout the year. Give us a call on 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote

06 September 2017

This week we have put together our top tips for all of you students who are heading off to university this month to make the process as easy as can be!

Sort out your paperwork
Every adult tenant in the UK needs to prove they have a Right to Rent, this means you need to make sure you have one of the these documents: Biometric Residence Permit with unlimited leave, UK Passport that is in date, EEA/Swiss national passport/identity card, passport or travel document endorsed with unlimited leave, UK immigration status document endorsed with unlimited leave, EEA/Swiss family member Permanent Residence card or a certificate of naturalisation or registration as a British citizen. If you have not got any of these there are other documents which you may show to prove your status in the UK a full list of which can be found on the gov.uk website. It is a legal responsibility of the landlord to check this and they can be hit with heavy fines if they don’t. Some letting agencies can ask you for things such as 3 months worth of bank statements, a character reference, confirmation of course enrolment or even a guarantor. Make sure you are prepared for these possibilities.

Have your deposit ready
Currently landlords normally ask for a 6 week deposit and your first months rent, ensure you have the money in order to cover these.

Think carefully about your housemates
Often you might get on great with someone in your first year of university and you decide to live together in your second year. Problems can occur when you realise that what your friends do or fail to do causes issues in your house and friendship. These can be simple things such as not washing the dishes but can have a massive impact. So ensure you set ground rules from the start.

Consider the area you are picking
Speak to students on campus, at the open day or find Facebook Freshers groups! Ask to find out what the best location is for your university and what the average rent is in the areas you are considering living in.

Rent with trusted experts
As there are no restrictions to who can become a landlord, this means anyone can rent a property out! To be sure on who you are renting from try to find agents who are affiliated with a professional network such as ARLA. ARLA is the Association of Residential Letting Agents and follow a strict code of conduct, so if anything goes wrong you have a credited body to complain to.

Remember the bills
When you are working out your budget don’t forget to include a budget for your bills! If you can, rent a property which already has bills inclusive as this makes things a lot easier in the long run.

Inventories are important
Make sure you have an accurate inventory of everything in the room/house when you move in. You can even take photos to compare the state of the property when you move out.

Read the small print
Ensure you read the tenancy agreement including any small print before signing the document!

Recently we have been focusing a lot of our attention on students, particularly things such as The Student Guide to paying the bills and Students: Top mistakes that can ruinyour credit score to help you further on your way we have conducted our top tips for renting out a property as a student.

At Discount Insurance we can cover your contents, credit cards, cover you for personal injury and more with our Students Insurance call 0800 294 4522 to get a quick quote!





Wednesday, September 06, 2017
This week we have put together our top tips for all of you students who are heading off to university this month to make the process as easy as can be!

Sort out your paperwork
Every adult tenant in the UK needs to prove they have a Right to Rent, this means you need to make sure you have one of the these documents: Biometric Residence Permit with unlimited leave, UK Passport that is in date, EEA/Swiss national passport/identity card, passport or travel document endorsed with unlimited leave, UK immigration status document endorsed with unlimited leave, EEA/Swiss family member Permanent Residence card or a certificate of naturalisation or registration as a British citizen. If you have not got any of these there are other documents which you may show to prove your status in the UK a full list of which can be found on the gov.uk website. It is a legal responsibility of the landlord to check this and they can be hit with heavy fines if they don’t. Some letting agencies can ask you for things such as 3 months worth of bank statements, a character reference, confirmation of course enrolment or even a guarantor. Make sure you are prepared for these possibilities.

Have your deposit ready
Currently landlords normally ask for a 6 week deposit and your first months rent, ensure you have the money in order to cover these.

Think carefully about your housemates
Often you might get on great with someone in your first year of university and you decide to live together in your second year. Problems can occur when you realise that what your friends do or fail to do causes issues in your house and friendship. These can be simple things such as not washing the dishes but can have a massive impact. So ensure you set ground rules from the start.

Consider the area you are picking
Speak to students on campus, at the open day or find Facebook Freshers groups! Ask to find out what the best location is for your university and what the average rent is in the areas you are considering living in.

Rent with trusted experts
As there are no restrictions to who can become a landlord, this means anyone can rent a property out! To be sure on who you are renting from try to find agents who are affiliated with a professional network such as ARLA. ARLA is the Association of Residential Letting Agents and follow a strict code of conduct, so if anything goes wrong you have a credited body to complain to.

Remember the bills
When you are working out your budget don’t forget to include a budget for your bills! If you can, rent a property which already has bills inclusive as this makes things a lot easier in the long run.

Inventories are important
Make sure you have an accurate inventory of everything in the room/house when you move in. You can even take photos to compare the state of the property when you move out.

Read the small print
Ensure you read the tenancy agreement including any small print before signing the document!

Recently we have been focusing a lot of our attention on students, particularly things such as The Student Guide to paying the bills and Students: Top mistakes that can ruinyour credit score to help you further on your way we have conducted our top tips for renting out a property as a student.

At Discount Insurance we can cover your contents, credit cards, cover you for personal injury and more with our Students Insurance call 0800 294 4522 to get a quick quote!





23 August 2017


With September quickly approaching, we have been busy creating a list of top tips for all you first year university students to help you on your way of moving out this September. Here is our top 6 tips:

       1. Decide if you want to move out alone, with friends or with strangers
If any of your friends decide on the same university it might be tempting to move in together, however, if that is the case ensure you establish some house rules so you don’t lose a friend over unwashed dishes or their share of the bills. Whether moving in with a friend or strangers ensure you have some ground rules for things such as cleaning, bills, visitors, common spaces, food and cooking.

       2. Check the location
Make sure you know the area you are moving into, including travel times! Make sure you also consider things such as broadband speeds when deciding on the property. When 5 people are sharing a property having more speed and bandwidth is essential, whether for your assignments or Netflix. Some areas also have a lot of cheap takeaways, which might come in useful or the property might be close to bars and clubs, which can be a good or a bad thing!

       3. Make sure you have everything you need to live on your own
Ensure you have a checklist of all the things you need for your accommodation like duvet covers, towels, pillows etc. There are online checklists you can use to help you. Make sure you also create a list of things you will need for your course like notebooks and pens.

       4. Make a budget
Make sure you think about all the costs involved in moving out and write up a budget for the things you need. Once you move in ensure you have a separate budget for living costs including rent, bills, travel and groceries. A budget for all the household items can be good if you are sharing, to make sure everyone is contributing equally.

       5. Carefully inspect the property you want to move into
If you are moving into rented accommodation ensure you ask a lot of questions and take photos, this will ensure no nasty surprises when you move in. You might want to ask one of your parents to inspect the property with you.

       6. Remember you can always ask for help
It can be a daunting experience to move out of your home for the first time, but do not feel like it’s embarrassing to ask for help. Check out what student services your university offers and speak to family and friends if in doubt!

       Students, ensure you get your contents covered with our Students Contents Insurance. Get a quote in less than 60 seconds online or call 0800 294 4522!




Wednesday, August 23, 2017

With September quickly approaching, we have been busy creating a list of top tips for all you first year university students to help you on your way of moving out this September. Here is our top 6 tips:

       1. Decide if you want to move out alone, with friends or with strangers
If any of your friends decide on the same university it might be tempting to move in together, however, if that is the case ensure you establish some house rules so you don’t lose a friend over unwashed dishes or their share of the bills. Whether moving in with a friend or strangers ensure you have some ground rules for things such as cleaning, bills, visitors, common spaces, food and cooking.

       2. Check the location
Make sure you know the area you are moving into, including travel times! Make sure you also consider things such as broadband speeds when deciding on the property. When 5 people are sharing a property having more speed and bandwidth is essential, whether for your assignments or Netflix. Some areas also have a lot of cheap takeaways, which might come in useful or the property might be close to bars and clubs, which can be a good or a bad thing!

       3. Make sure you have everything you need to live on your own
Ensure you have a checklist of all the things you need for your accommodation like duvet covers, towels, pillows etc. There are online checklists you can use to help you. Make sure you also create a list of things you will need for your course like notebooks and pens.

       4. Make a budget
Make sure you think about all the costs involved in moving out and write up a budget for the things you need. Once you move in ensure you have a separate budget for living costs including rent, bills, travel and groceries. A budget for all the household items can be good if you are sharing, to make sure everyone is contributing equally.

       5. Carefully inspect the property you want to move into
If you are moving into rented accommodation ensure you ask a lot of questions and take photos, this will ensure no nasty surprises when you move in. You might want to ask one of your parents to inspect the property with you.

       6. Remember you can always ask for help
It can be a daunting experience to move out of your home for the first time, but do not feel like it’s embarrassing to ask for help. Check out what student services your university offers and speak to family and friends if in doubt!

       Students, ensure you get your contents covered with our Students Contents Insurance. Get a quote in less than 60 seconds online or call 0800 294 4522!




26 July 2017

       
Home maintenance
A certain level of home maintenance is expected by insurers, if your property isn't kept in a reasonable state, future claims may be denied. Weather damage is usually only covered if it's severe, such as due to violent storms or flooding.

Building work
When you are having builders at your property, ensure you let your insurer know, as any accidental damage might not be covered if you don’t. This can temporarily increase your premium as there is more risk of accidental damage like burst pipes. Any work, which will alter the size or shape of your property will also impact any future claims and can make your claim invalid.

Locks on windows and doors
When purchasing your policy ensure you let your insurer know the correct type of locks you have because, if you provide wrong information then your claim might become invalid. If you leave the windows open or your key in your door, your burglary claim might also be invalid due to no signs of forced entry.

Social Media
If you announce on social media that you are going away, your insurer might not pay out a burglary claim. Insurers are looking at things like Facebook or Twitter more often and this can be seen as negligence. 

Extended holidays
If you are going away for an extended period of time, especially over a period of 30 days you need to either inform your insurer so they can adjust the premium accordingly or you should consider getting a house sitter. When it comes to a claim your insurer is unlikely to pay out if you are not in the house for an extended period. 

Lodgers and short term lets
Even if you are only renting a room out for a couple of weeks, you need to let your insurer know. If a tenant causes any damage and your insurer was not aware you had someone living with you, they could reject the claim.

Flood damage
While cleaning up after flood damage, ensure you do not get rid of anything an insurance assessor would need to see to provide evidence for your claim.

Alarms
If you tell your insurer that you have an alarm, ensure you turn it on when you leave your property. If you don’t and your property gets burgled you will not be eligible to claim.

Telling the police
In case of burglary you need to let the police know within 24 hours to obtain a crime reference number, which you can provide to the insurer. If you do not do this, your claim may be invalid.

Working from home
Insurers need to know if you are working from home, especially if your occupation is considered a ‘risk’ like carpentry or cooking. If you work from home, a higher level of visitors is therefore assumed a higher risk of theft and other associated claims.

Failure to secure valuables in your garden
Ensure you know which valuables likely to be in your garden in hot weather are insured or extend your policy to include those. Secure any valuables in sheds or garages when you’re not around.

Securing tools
If any tools are left outside like hammers, ladders or wrenches and they are used to break into your home, your insurer can see this as negligence and therefore this can invalidate your claim.

At Discount Insurance we offer home insurance policies from a range of leading UK insurers, allowing you to find the right cover to meet your needs. Call 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote!

Wednesday, July 26, 2017
       
Home maintenance
A certain level of home maintenance is expected by insurers, if your property isn't kept in a reasonable state, future claims may be denied. Weather damage is usually only covered if it's severe, such as due to violent storms or flooding.

Building work
When you are having builders at your property, ensure you let your insurer know, as any accidental damage might not be covered if you don’t. This can temporarily increase your premium as there is more risk of accidental damage like burst pipes. Any work, which will alter the size or shape of your property will also impact any future claims and can make your claim invalid.

Locks on windows and doors
When purchasing your policy ensure you let your insurer know the correct type of locks you have because, if you provide wrong information then your claim might become invalid. If you leave the windows open or your key in your door, your burglary claim might also be invalid due to no signs of forced entry.

Social Media
If you announce on social media that you are going away, your insurer might not pay out a burglary claim. Insurers are looking at things like Facebook or Twitter more often and this can be seen as negligence. 

Extended holidays
If you are going away for an extended period of time, especially over a period of 30 days you need to either inform your insurer so they can adjust the premium accordingly or you should consider getting a house sitter. When it comes to a claim your insurer is unlikely to pay out if you are not in the house for an extended period. 

Lodgers and short term lets
Even if you are only renting a room out for a couple of weeks, you need to let your insurer know. If a tenant causes any damage and your insurer was not aware you had someone living with you, they could reject the claim.

Flood damage
While cleaning up after flood damage, ensure you do not get rid of anything an insurance assessor would need to see to provide evidence for your claim.

Alarms
If you tell your insurer that you have an alarm, ensure you turn it on when you leave your property. If you don’t and your property gets burgled you will not be eligible to claim.

Telling the police
In case of burglary you need to let the police know within 24 hours to obtain a crime reference number, which you can provide to the insurer. If you do not do this, your claim may be invalid.

Working from home
Insurers need to know if you are working from home, especially if your occupation is considered a ‘risk’ like carpentry or cooking. If you work from home, a higher level of visitors is therefore assumed a higher risk of theft and other associated claims.

Failure to secure valuables in your garden
Ensure you know which valuables likely to be in your garden in hot weather are insured or extend your policy to include those. Secure any valuables in sheds or garages when you’re not around.

Securing tools
If any tools are left outside like hammers, ladders or wrenches and they are used to break into your home, your insurer can see this as negligence and therefore this can invalidate your claim.

At Discount Insurance we offer home insurance policies from a range of leading UK insurers, allowing you to find the right cover to meet your needs. Call 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote!

13 July 2017

The process: 
Imagine the home you want costs £200,000 but you can only somehow borrow a mortgage of £100,000 because of your income and the sizes of your deposit. 

Shared ownership is a part buy and part rent government backed scheme which usually allows first time buyers to buy 35% to 75% share of new homes and pay rent of the remainder. If you’ve found the perfect home but you can’t afford to take out a mortgage for the full asking price, you will still need to have saved a small deposit which is usually around 5%.











Who can apply: 
This scheme supports buyers who would struggle to buy a home or even have a hard time even renting a home on the open market.

To apply you need to be the first time buyer in the permanent employment, live or work locally, have family connections to the area you want to buy in, and also have a total household income of up to £80.000.












Costs involved: 
With a 5% deposit you’ll need to pay for reservations and mortgage or survey, legal fees and stamp duty you will also need to factor in the coast of moving homes, example hiring and removal firm. 

Ensure that your budget is enough to purchase the property, as surveyors and legal fees may be higher than normal, either have the cash ready to buy the property outright or find a specialist lender that is happy the lend on the property before you make an offers.  












Advice: 
Secure a specialist legal company to carry out the buy, usually someone local to the area that has experience of any additional properties needs and renovation. 

Also make sure you secure the help of builders with experience in renovating properties via a contract. While market rates increased across the country, rents increase for tenants who renewed their leases.       















At Discount Insurance we provide high quality Landlord Insurance to suit your needs at a price that will suit your budget!  Give us at 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today!

Thursday, July 13, 2017
The process: 
Imagine the home you want costs £200,000 but you can only somehow borrow a mortgage of £100,000 because of your income and the sizes of your deposit. 

Shared ownership is a part buy and part rent government backed scheme which usually allows first time buyers to buy 35% to 75% share of new homes and pay rent of the remainder. If you’ve found the perfect home but you can’t afford to take out a mortgage for the full asking price, you will still need to have saved a small deposit which is usually around 5%.











Who can apply: 
This scheme supports buyers who would struggle to buy a home or even have a hard time even renting a home on the open market.

To apply you need to be the first time buyer in the permanent employment, live or work locally, have family connections to the area you want to buy in, and also have a total household income of up to £80.000.












Costs involved: 
With a 5% deposit you’ll need to pay for reservations and mortgage or survey, legal fees and stamp duty you will also need to factor in the coast of moving homes, example hiring and removal firm. 

Ensure that your budget is enough to purchase the property, as surveyors and legal fees may be higher than normal, either have the cash ready to buy the property outright or find a specialist lender that is happy the lend on the property before you make an offers.  












Advice: 
Secure a specialist legal company to carry out the buy, usually someone local to the area that has experience of any additional properties needs and renovation. 

Also make sure you secure the help of builders with experience in renovating properties via a contract. While market rates increased across the country, rents increase for tenants who renewed their leases.       















At Discount Insurance we provide high quality Landlord Insurance to suit your needs at a price that will suit your budget!  Give us at 0800 294 4522 for a quick quote today!